2015 Puget Sound Fact Book report cover
Reference publication

The Puget Sound Fact Book brings together statistics and other information about the health and makeup of the ecosystem. Areas of focus include climate change, geography, water quality, habitats, human dimensions and regional species.

Nisqually Reserve Fish Sampling March 2012. Photo: Michael Grilliot, DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/wastatednr/6834386824
Magazine

Timely, local stories about ecosystem recovery. Our magazine series brings you in-depth reporting on some of the key issues facing Puget Sound. 

Water Jellyfish; Photo by Dave Cowles. Courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Life.
Species Library

Our species library features checklists of species found in the Salish Sea watershed, from vertebrates and invertebrates, to plants and algae. Read thousands of descriptions from the Encyclopedia of Life and find status and trends for regional species of concern.  

Report cover
Report

A 2015 report commissioned in part by the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound provides the most comprehensive assessment to date of the expected impacts of climate change on the region.

pharmaceuticals such as NSAIDs are among contaminants of emerging concern
Chemistry

Thousands of different compounds, including pharmaceuticals and personal care products, are produced and used as part of our daily lives.  Advances in analytical methods have allowed the detection of many of these compounds in the environment.

Satellite map of ShoreZone habitats symbolized by major substrate
Habitats

Explore the web's most complete and up-to-date habitat classifications for the shorelines of Puget Sound and the Washington coast.

Biennial Science Work Plan report cover
Report

Every two years, the state's Puget Sound Science Panel identifies decision-critical science needs for Puget Sound recovery. The 2014-2016 Biennial Science Work Plan is now available for download, along with a non-technical summary from the Encyclopedia of Puget Sound.

2015 Puget Sound Fact Book report cover
Nisqually Reserve Fish Sampling March 2012. Photo: Michael Grilliot, DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/wastatednr/6834386824
Water Jellyfish; Photo by Dave Cowles. Courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Life.
Report cover
pharmaceuticals such as NSAIDs are among contaminants of emerging concern
Satellite map of ShoreZone habitats symbolized by major substrate
Biennial Science Work Plan report cover

occurs (regularly, as a native taxon) in multiple nations

Report

The growing number of species of concern in the Salish Sea suggests ecosystem decay is outpacing recovery

Tufted puffin (Fratercula cirrhata) status changed from Candidate to Endangered in WA. Photo: Peter Davis, US Fish and Wildlife Service

The number of species of concern in the Salish Sea is growing at 2.6% annually, according to a report presented at the 2016 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in B.C.

Recent papers

View selected papers and reports related to Puget Sound science. The list is generated monthly through alerts by Google Scholar, and we welcome additional suggestions.

Species of the day

photo of Eschrichtius robustus (Gray Whale). Source: http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/pr/images/cetaceans/graywhale-merrillgosho_noaa.jpg

Selected pubs

Peruse major, recurring publications and event proceedings related to Puget Sound science. If you want to understand the issues that were relevant for a given time period, these are key documents to read.

Magazine

Salish Sea Currents: Themes from the 2016 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference

We sent a fleet of ten science writers and roving reporters to cover major science themes presented at #SSEC16 in Vancouver, BC. Read the stories we published live from the conference... and look for more over the coming weeks and months.

News

Conference coverage from Salish Sea Currents: Watch for updates and stories about the 2016 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in Salish Sea Currents

The Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference begins April 13th: More than 1100 scientists and researchers will meet in Vancouver to share information on the state of the ecosystem.

A paradigm shift for shoreline armoring: Rethinking a long-standing battle with the elements.

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