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Summer stories in EoPS

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A lot of great stories are coming in for our Salish Sea writers series. Last month we sent 11 writers to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference to report on some of the key takeaways from the event. Look for a series of articles in these pages starting in July. Stories will range from the "salmon survival bottleneck"—why are so many of Puget Sound's salmon dying young?—to the state of the region's marine birds, new eelgrass targets and many others.

Nisqually Reserve Fish Sampling March 2012. Photo: Michael Grilliot, DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/wastatednr/6834386824
Nisqually Reserve Fish Sampling March 2012. Photo: Michael Grilliot, DNR (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) https://www.flickr.com/photos/wastatednr/6834386824

A lot of great stories are coming in for our Salish Sea writers series. Last month we sent 11 writers to the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference to report on some of the key takeaways from the event. Look for a series of articles in these pages starting in July. Stories will range from the "salmon survival bottleneck"—why are so many of Puget Sound's salmon dying young?—to the state of the region's marine birds, new eelgrass targets and many others.

A sneak preview: Salish Sea writer Emily Davis sent us this picture of some of the research going on in the Nisqually Delta. Floodplains provide a crucial link between the freshwater and the marine environment for young salmon. New studies presented at the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference say healthier floodplains and river deltas could overcome a possible survival bottleneck, providing big gains for salmon restoration.