Traditional ecological knowledge

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), sometimes called Indigenous Knowledge, refers to cumulative knowledge and experience that indigenous cultures have of their environment. In the last thirty years, there has been growing interest in TEK as a resource for restoration and conservation projects.

Sources:

Vinyeta, Kristen. A Synthesis of Literature on Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Climate Change. Pacific Northwest Tribal Climate Change Project. Draft accessed 8/10/2012. http://tribalclimate.uoregon.edu/files/2010/11/TEK_CC_Draft_3-13-2012.pdf

 

Coast Salish Canoe Journey 2009 landing in Pillar Point; photo by Carol Reiss, USGS

OVERVIEW

Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK), sometimes called Indigenous Knowledge, refers to cumulative knowledge and experience that indigenous cultures have of their environment. In the last thirty years, there has been growing interest in TEK as a resource for restoration and conservation projects.

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