Species of concern

Species of concern are native species, sub-species or ecologically significant units that warrant special attention to ensure their conservation. The number of species of concern within the Salish Sea is used by the US Environmental Protection Agency and Environment Canada as a transboundary ecosystem indicator (called "Marine Species at Risk"). 

Source

Zier, Jacqlynn and Gaydos, Joseph K. (2016). The growing number of species of concern in the Salish Sea suggests ecosystem decay is outpacing recovery. Proceedings of the 2016 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference, April 13-15, 2016
Vancouver, BC. 17 pgs.

The Tufted Puffin is among 125 species of concern found in the Salish Sea. Photo: Peter Hodum.

OVERVIEW

The growing number of species of concern in the Salish Sea suggests ecosystem decay is outpacing recovery

The number of species of concern in the Salish Sea is growing at an average annual rate of 2.6%, according to a report published in the proceedings of the 2016 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in Vancouver, B.C.

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