Floodplains

Floodplains are the areas of low-lying ground adjacent to rivers, formed mainly of nutrient-rich river sediments and subject to flooding after storms and heavy snowmelt.

Source: Floodplains by Design

Aerial photo of Hansen Creek restoration site in Skagit County, WA. October 15, 2010. Photo: Kari Neumeyer/NWIFC

OVERVIEW

Nature inspires new approach to flood control

Scientists are rethinking floodplain management in Puget Sound. Can we have our farms and salmon too?

RELATED ARTICLES

Dean Toba, a scientific technician with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, operates the agency’s screw trap on the Skagit River. The trap helps biologists estimate the number of juvenile salmon leaving the river each year. Photo: Christopher Dunagan, PSI
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2016 aerial view of completed Calistoga Reach levee project in Orting, WA. Image courtesy: CSI Drone Solutions and Washington Rock Quarries, Inc. Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2H_NK6U2_zw
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Fir Island Farms habitat restoration monitoring in Skagit County. Project provides rearing habitat for young threatened Chinook salmon along with other wildlife. Copyright: Bob Friel
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Finding a strategy to accelerate Chinook recovery

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Birch Bay. Photo by Jeff Rice
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Report cover for State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound
11/16/2015

State of Knowledge: Climate Change in Puget Sound

A 2015 report from the University of Washington provides the most comprehensive assessment to date of the expected impacts of climate change on the Puget Sound region.

Woodard Creek Basin water resource protection study report cover
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McLane Creek Basin water resource protection study report cover
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Black Lake Basin water resource protection study report cover
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Puget Sound portion of a 1798 chart showing "part of the coast of N.W. America : with the tracks of His Majesty's sloop Discovery and armed tender Chatham / commanded by George Vancouver, Esqr. and prepared under his immediate inspection by Lieut. Joseph Baker." Credit: Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division.
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Hansen Creek Alluvial Fan and Wetland restoration project (Poster #1)
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Hansen Creek alluvial fan and wetland restoration project

Habitat restoration was undertaken in 2009-2010 on lower Hansen Creek, Washington. The project converted 140 acres of isolated floodplain into 53 acres of alluvial fan and 87 acres of flow-through wetlands.

The 2012/2013 Action Agenda for Puget Sound cover page
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The 2012/2013 Action Agenda for Puget Sound

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The 2014/2015 Action Agenda for Puget Sound cover page
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Submerged marsh in Fisher Slough. Image courtesy of NOAA.
2/5/2014

Floodplains by Design

Floodplains by Design identifies floodplains in Puget Sound with multiple benefit potential and use information on flood risk to inform ecosystem restoration.