Contaminants of emerging concern

Thousands of different compounds are produced and used as part of our daily lives.  Examples include pharmaceuticals (NSAIDs, birth control pills, etc), personal care products (sun screen agents, scents, preservatives, etc), food additives (artificial sweeteners) and compounds used in industrial and commercial applications (flame retardants, antibiotics, etc).  Advances in analytical methods have allowed the detection of many of these compounds in the environment. These compounds are sometimes referred to as contaminants of emerging concern (CECs), and can enter waterways through sources such as filtered wastewater, stormwater and agricultural runoff.  

 

Source: Encyclopedia of Puget Sound

CECs include pharmaceuticals and thousands of other commonly used chemical compounds. Photo courtesy of EPA.

OVERVIEW

Contaminants of emerging concern in the Salish Sea

Thousands of different compounds are produced and used as part of our daily lives.  Examples include pharmaceuticals (NSAIDs, birth control pills, etc), personal care products (sun screen agents, scents, preservatives, etc), food additives (artificial sweeteners) and compounds used in industrial and commercial applications (flame retardants, antibiotics, etc).  Advances in analytical methods have allowed the detection of many of these compounds in the environment.

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