Zooplankton

Zooplankton, tiny marine crustaceans, are a critical link between primary producers, or plants and algae that trap energy from the sun, and larger species like fish, mammals and birds. Many of the most important species in Puget Sound rely upon zooplankton, including salmon, forage fish like herring, surf perch, and sand lance, hake, Pollock, and shrimp. Yet, no comprehensive zooplankton monitoring program exists in Puget Sound. Each Puget Sound basin has its own unique zooplankton and bacteria community. Copepods are typically the most dominant zooplankton type in Puget Sound.

Source: Encyclopedia of Puget Sound

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