Water Jellyfish; Photo by Dave Cowles. Courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Life.
Species Library

Our updated species library features checklists of species found in the Puget Sound watershed, from vertebrates and invertebrates, to plants and algae. Read thousands of descriptions from the Encyclopedia of Life and find status and trends for regional species of concern.  

Satellite map of ShoreZone habitats symbolized by major substrate
Habitats

Explore the web's most complete and up-to-date habitat classifications for the shorelines of Puget Sound and the Washington coast.

Surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus). Image courtesy of NOAA.
Report

Forage fish represent a critical link in the Puget Sound food web, but may be vulnerable on a variety of fronts according to a study panel report from the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute.

Figure and title from 1954 UW report on oceanographic effects of Puget Sound surface winds
Document Archive

Our document archive includes a rich history of Puget Sound science, from the State of the Sound to a complete collection of Salish Sea conference proceedings.

The Paradise River flows away from the peak of Mt. Rainier in Mt. Rainier National Park.
Our scope

Puget Sound is fed by its many water sources, from high elevation snowmelt to floodplains and wetlands. Articles and accounts feature terrestrial species and environments, as well as nearshore and marine systems. View watershed boundaries.

Puget Sound Partnership "Vital Signs"
Report

A report by the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute describes a 2013 workshop to integrate the social sciences into Puget Sound ecosystem monitoring.

Herring spawn research in Puget Sound. Photo courtesy of NOAA
Biennial Science Work Plan

The Puget Sound Partnership is collaborating with the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute to prepare an inventory of current scientific research related to Puget Sound recovery. This draft assessment will eventually be available as part of the Partnership's Biennial Science Work Plan

Water Jellyfish; Photo by Dave Cowles. Courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Life.
Satellite map of ShoreZone habitats symbolized by major substrate
Surf smelt (Hypomesus pretiosus). Image courtesy of NOAA.
Figure and title from 1954 UW report on oceanographic effects of Puget Sound surface winds
The Paradise River flows away from the peak of Mt. Rainier in Mt. Rainier National Park.
Puget Sound Partnership "Vital Signs"
Herring spawn research in Puget Sound. Photo courtesy of NOAA

The voice of eelgrass

Wade out into the shallows of Puget Sound on a warm, sunny day and put your ear close to the water. You might catch the faint, champagne-like bubbling of eelgrass. Take a listen to an underwater recording made at the Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. A hydrophone captures the sound of oxygen bubbling from eelgrass leaves as the plant absorbs and photosynthesizes the sun's rays.

Magazine

New Salish Sea science magazine launches

Western grebe. Public Pier, Blaine, WA. Photo: Andrew Reding https://www.flickr.com/photos/seaotter/10298390254

Salish Sea Currents is a new online science magazine capturing key themes from the 2014 Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference. The first story looks at troubling declines in western grebes and other marine birds.

Recent papers

View selected papers and reports related to Puget Sound science. The list is generated monthly through alerts by Google Scholar, and we welcome additional suggestions.

Species of the day

photo of Cornus sericea (Red-osier Dogwood). Source: http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7195/6929309318_d1a1863e62_z.jpg
Science Review

What we know about Salish Sea harbor seals

Harbor seal vocalizing on rock

Harbor seals are the most commonly seen marine mammals in the Salish Sea and can be found throughout the region at all times of the year. They have been intensively studied here and a new in-depth profile from Jacqlynn Zier and Joe Gaydos provides an overview of their local ecology and behavior.

Read the full profile

News

Wade out into the shallows of Puget Sound on a warm, sunny day and put your ear close to the water. You might catch the faint, champagne-like bubbling of eelgrass. Read more. 

Download EoPS ringtones

As featured in Seattle Magazine.

Defining the watershed

How do we define the Puget Sound watershed? The boundaries are mapped using hydrologic unit codes (HUCs), nationally standardized divisions used by conservation agencies.

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