Satellite map of ShoreZone habitats symbolized by major substrate
Habitats

Explore the web's most complete and up-to-date habitat classifications for the shorelines of Puget Sound and the Washington coast.

Water Jellyfish; Photo by Dave Cowles. Courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Life.
Species Library

Our updated species library features checklists of species found in the Puget Sound watershed, from vertebrates and invertebrates, to plants and algae. Read thousands of descriptions from the Encyclopedia of Life and find status and trends for regional species of concern.  

pharmaceuticals such as NSAIDs are among contaminants of emerging concern
Chemistry

Thousands of different compounds, including pharmaceuticals and personal care products, are produced and used as part of our daily lives.  Advances in analytical methods have allowed the detection of many of these compounds in the environment.

Figure and title from 1954 UW report on oceanographic effects of Puget Sound surface winds
Document Archive

Our document archive includes a rich history of Puget Sound science, from the State of the Sound to a complete collection of Salish Sea conference proceedings.

Quality of Life on the Puget Sound Vital Signs wheel
Report

A 2014 report from the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute identifies 23 potential indicators of human wellbeing in the Puget Sound region. These indicators will inform the adoption of Human Quality of Life "Vital Signs" by the Puget Sound Partnership.

The Nisqually River flows away from the peak of Mt. Rainier in Mt. Rainier National Park.
Our scope

Puget Sound is fed by its many water sources, from high elevation snowmelt to floodplains and wetlands. Articles and accounts feature terrestrial species and environments, as well as nearshore and marine systems. View watershed boundaries.

Herring spawn research in Puget Sound. Photo courtesy of NOAA.
Biennial Science Work Plan

The Puget Sound Partnership is collaborating with the University of Washington Puget Sound Institute to prepare an inventory of current scientific research related to Puget Sound recovery. This draft assessment will eventually be available as part of the Partnership's Biennial Science Work Plan. 

Satellite map of ShoreZone habitats symbolized by major substrate
Water Jellyfish; Photo by Dave Cowles. Courtesy of the Encyclopedia of Life.
pharmaceuticals such as NSAIDs are among contaminants of emerging concern
Figure and title from 1954 UW report on oceanographic effects of Puget Sound surface winds
Quality of Life on the Puget Sound Vital Signs wheel
The Nisqually River flows away from the peak of Mt. Rainier in Mt. Rainier National Park.
Herring spawn research in Puget Sound. Photo courtesy of NOAA.

Identifying the greatest threats to Puget Sound

In the early days of Puget Sound conservation, it seemed like the polluters were easier to spot. There were the usual suspects, like industrial pipes pumping toxic chemicals into the water, or contaminted Superfund sites. We began to understand that dams were bad for salmon and that we shouldn't overharvest our natural resources. Those problems still persist, but ecosystem management has become increasingly complicated since the 1970s and 1980s.

Recent papers

Top–down control by great blue herons regulates seagrass-associated epifauna

Scientists from British Columbia recently showed that great blue heron predation in eelgrass meadows reduces benthic (seafloor) fish abundance, but increases diversity of invertebrates. 

Recent papers

View selected papers and reports related to Puget Sound science. The list is generated monthly through alerts by Google Scholar, and we welcome additional suggestions.

Species of the day

photo of Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle). Source: http://www.photolib.noaa.gov/700s/anim0596.jpg
Report

New framework for monitoring of emerging contaminants in the Pacific Northwest

photo collage: contaminants of emerging concern

The Puget Sound Ecosystem Monitoring Program (PSEMP), along with partners from the US EPA Columbia River Program and USGS Oregon Water Science Center, have developed a framework for prioritizing monitoring of Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CECs) in the Pacific Northwest.

Read more about the CEC monitoring framework.

News

SAVE THE DATE: The next Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference is scheduled for April 13-15, 2016 in Vancouver, B.C. Read more. 

Download EoPS ringtones

As featured in Seattle Magazine.

Defining the watershed

How do we define the Puget Sound watershed? The boundaries are mapped using hydrologic unit codes (HUCs), nationally standardized divisions used by conservation agencies.

Subscribe to Front page feed